Mindful Eating

19 11 2012

“Food and emotional nourishment are intimately bound together in the depths of our unconscious. Just as you might fill an inner emptiness with food, so you can reject or deny your needs, and therefore reject food, in the misbelieve that the smaller the body the less the longing for love.” Deb Shapiro, Your Body Speaks Your Mind

Eating mindfully is not a diet or special formula for weight loss, but a way to live in the moment and notice behaviors that may not be serving us. Most of these behaviors have become habitual reactions to common triggers we encounter throughout our day.

One trigger may be stress. Stress is our body’s way of redistributing energy: our hearts start to race, our blood sugar rises, and we are more alert. This is good if it is for a short period of time, but our lifestyles have put our body’s stress mode into overdrive. This causes the adrenal glands to produce higher than normal levels of cortisol, which has been linked to increased weight gain, particularly in the abdominal area.

Sleep may be a cause for some that deal with weight problems. Too much or too little sleep has been proven to increase hormones that affect our ability to read the signs of hunger and fullness.

There is no easy or quick way to lose weight and maintain a healthy lifestyle. You may need to go deeper into your current patterns for dealing with stress. Do you eat to feel better? What feelings do you associate with certain foods? What foods do you eat to suppress feelings of anger or loneliness? What is preventing you from breaking through these habits?

Tammy’s Challenges

Mind: Examine your feelings about your body, relationships, and other areas of your life. Are these feelings true? Begin to notice negative thoughts running through your mind and replace them with life-affirming thoughts to heal those feelings. It may not be easy at first, but you may be surprised at the thoughts that may be keeping you from being the person you would like to be.

Body: Focus on a healthy body. Find exercise that you like to do. Realize that what you are capable of may not be what your spouse or friend is able to do. Your body is built different, you are at different places in your life, but you are doing what you know to be best for you.

Make room for plenty of rest.

Explore ways to reduce stress: yoga, meditation, journal, etc., and incorporate them regularly into your daily life.

Soul: Spend time to discover your passion. What do you enjoy doing? What do you do well? Explore your passion and share it with others. Send that positive, loving energy out into the world.

How are you taking care of yourself?

Namaste

Tammy





Goals vs. Intentions

23 07 2012

We are almost half way through the year. How are you doing on your New Year’s resolutions for 2012? Have you accomplished what you set out to achieve? Are you moving closer to your goals? If you are struggling with what you thought the New Year would bring or gave up on what you hoped would be, maybe you are like me and have confused your intentions with your goals.

It is a good idea to have goals that map out your desires. They require a plan and the discipline to follow through with the plan to make them real. As you proceed and work the plan, you begin to live your life in the future. If you reach your goal will you be happy? What if your efforts do not produce the ideal plan you had in mind? Do you start to doubt yourself? Do your dreams become unattainable? Will that make you unhappy?

Now, let’s look at intentions. When I think of my intentions, it is more about how I am living right now, this moment. Am I the type of person I want to be? Am I acting, speaking, thinking like that person? I want to live every day by the human values I believe to be important. When I focus on my intentions I am motivated to achieve my goals. Don’t get me wrong, there are times that I become side-tracked from my plan and react in an undesirable way. This is when I need to refocus and feel my intentions to help create my future, even when it is different than I had originally planned.

It is an ongoing practice for me to live in the moment. But, when I am in touch with my intentions, I am more successful in reaching my goals. My desires and wants are not my focus. These goals are ever changing or may become another goal or may never achieved. It is my intentions that remain and give me peace of mind. I am not giving up on my goals nor am I trying to be perfect. My attempt is to let go of the competition, the judgments, and the expectations attached to those goals. This is my journey.

Tammy’s Challenges

Growth does not come from one perspective. To achieve a healthy lifestyle, you must do more than concentrate on exercise alone. Diet changes will enhance your wellbeing, but it alone is not healthy. Let’s not forget the soul or spirit. It needs nurturing as well. So, here are a few mind (diet) – body (exercise) – soul (mental) challenges for you to try.

Mind: Put your eating utensil down between every bite.

Body: Act like your inner child. Skip, ride a bike, go to the park.

Soul: Do something kind for someone else, anonymously.

 

I would love to hear from you.  Email: Tammy@TammYoga.com

Facebook: TammYoga

Twitter: @TammYoga

Namaste  (The spirit in me respects the spirit in you.)

Tammy





What’s So Great About Broccoli?

26 06 2012

Article printed in the Weekly Record Herald on June 24, 2012

I had a hard time with broccoli as a child. Mom saying “it’s good for you” just wasn’t enough for me to choose to eat it. I guess I am the type of person that needs to know why. It wasn’t until I was older and started to focus on a healthier body that I realized how wonderful broccoli is. Now, I eat broccoli several times a week. Mom would be proud.

You may have read about cruciferous vegetables as must-have foods we should eat several times a week. The cruciferous vegetables have been linked to lower rates of cancer, containing phytochemicals that increase the activity of certain enzymes in our bodies that fight cancer-causing agents. Broccoli is in the cruciferous family. This is the kind of information I needed to include broccoli in my diet on a regular basis.

Anyone watching their weight may want to consider adding more broccoli to their diet. The fiber in broccoli helps with digestion and is filling, while low in calories and fat. Here is where you need to be careful! How the broccoli is prepared (sauces, other ingredients, etc.) can add calories and fat. It can be steamed, microwaved, stir-fried, eaten raw in salads, and baked in casseroles. Be careful not to overcook, which would result in lowering the nutritional value.

Broccoli is available year-round, but best in fall and winter. Look for sturdy, dark-green spears with tight buds, no yellowing. If broccoli tops have more purple, it indicates a higher level of carotenoids. The stems are edible, so don’t throw them away. Peel, chop, and serve with the florets. Refrigerate for up to 3 days.

Broccoli Slaw From Eating Well: Winter 2004, The Eating Well Diabetes Cookbook (2005). The original recipe has been lightened with reduced-fat may and yogurt. This makes eight servings, 3/4 cup each.

Ingredients:

4 slices turkey bacon

One 12-16 ounce bag shredded broccoli slaw or one large bunch broccoli (about 1-1/2 pounds)

¼ cup low-fat or nonfat plain yogurt

¼ cup reduced-fat mayonnaise

3 tablespoons cider vinegar

2 teaspoons sugar

½ teaspoon salt, or to taste

Freshly ground pepper

One 8 ounce can low-sodium sliced water chestnuts, rinsed and coarsely chopped

½ cup finely diced red onion

Preparation:

Cook bacon in a large skillet over medium heat, turning frequently, until crisp, 5 to 8 minutes. (Alternatively, microwave on high for 2-1/2 to 3 minutes.) Drain bacon on paper towels. Chop coarsely. If using whole broccoli, trim about 3 inches off the stems. Chop the rest into ¼ inch pieces. Whisk yogurt, mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add water chestnuts, onion, bacon, and broccoli; toss to coat. Chill until serve time. You can also make ahead, cover, and chill for up to 2 days.
Tammy’s Challenges

Growth does not come from one perspective. To achieve a healthy lifestyle, you must do more than concentrate on exercise alone. Diet changes will enhance your wellbeing, but it alone is not healthy. Let’s not forget the soul or spirit. It needs nurturing as well. So, here are a few mind (diet) – body (exercise) – soul (mental) challenges for you to try.

Mind: Try a new healthy recipe or make a favorite recipe healthier.

Body: Take the stairs, park further away from destination, bike or walk on errand.

Soul: Before bed imagine your perfect tomorrow.
I would love to hear from you.

Email: Tammy@TammYoga.com

Facebook: TammYoga

Twitter: @TammYoga.

Namaste  (The spirit in me respects the spirit in you.)

Tammy





The Scoop on Whole Grains

16 05 2012

Article printed in the Weekly Record Herald on May 13, 2012

Hi, my name is Tammy Shellhaas. I am a yoga instructor/personal trainer and I would like you to join me on a journey to challenge your mind, body, and soul. Every other week we will explore a new aspect of a healthy lifestyle. My hope is to offer new information, or a new perspective to what you already know, or reintroduce an idea that may have been forgotten. So, let’s get started…

When our children were small, I decided to make the switch to whole grain products. I admit, I was a little sneaky about it, but it was for the benefit of our family. So, I justified my underhandedness for our healthier lifestyle.

At first, I used whole grains, solely, when making out favorite dishes. That did not go over very well with the kids or John! (I have to admit, I was not a fan at first, either.) I did not give up. I decided to make small changes. I substituted a portion of the white flour in bread, cookie and pancake recipes with whole grain flour and gradually increased the amount as we became accustomed to the texture and taste.  I did the same when substituting refined grain pasta with whole grain.

I read labels to choose the best products I could find and we learned to enjoy and savor the taste of these healthier foods. The whole foods were denser and more filling, adding nutrients we were missing from our diet. By including whole grains to our diet, we increased our intake of plant-based proteins, fiber, and antioxidants. Plus, foods high in fiber and antioxidants have been linked to reducing the risk for certain health problems: obesity, stroke, and certain types of cancers.

What is a Whole Grain?

Following is the official definition of whole grains, approved and endorsed by the Whole Grains Council in May 2004:

Whole grains or foods made from them contain all the essential parts and naturally-occurring nutrients of the entire grain seed. If the grain has been processed (e.g., cracked, crushed, rolled, extruded, and/or cooked), the food product should deliver approximately the same rich balance of nutrients that are found in the original grain seed.

This definition means that 100% of the original kernel – all of the bran, germ, and endosperm – must be present to qualify as a whole grain.

I take this to mean that a food labeled whole grain is as close as possible to eating the food right from the plant. Can’t get much better for you than that! The Whole Grain Stamp is an easy way to spot products with ½ a serving (8 g.) of whole grains.

What are examples of whole grain?

What is a serving size?

  • 1/2 cup cooked brown rice or other cooked grain
  • 1/2 cup cooked 100% whole-grain pasta
  • 1/2 cup cooked hot cereal, such as oatmeal
  • 1 ounce uncooked whole grain pasta, brown rice or other grain
  • 1 slice 100% whole grain bread
  • 1 very small (1 oz.) 100% whole grain muffin
  • 1 cup 100% whole grain ready-to-eat cereal

Some foods contain whole grains, as well as, refined grains. Crackers, pancake mixes, meal replacement bars, and products that contain a larger amount of whole grains, it is necessary to eat more of those foods. The recommended serving size for these foods is 16 grams.

Tammy’s Challenges

Growth does not come from one perspective. To achieve a healthy lifestyle, you must do more than concentrate on exercise alone. Diet changes will enhance your wellbeing, but it alone is not healthy. Let’s not forget the soul or spirit. It needs nurturing as well. So, here are a few mind (diet) – body (exercise) – soul (mental) challenges for you to try.

Mind: Try substituting a portion of the refined grains in recipes with whole grains.

Body: Try a new cardio machine (treadmill, elliptical, etc.) or change your workout route.

Soul: Write down 10 things that make you smile. Keep the list and refer to it whenever you need a pick-me-up.

I would love to hear from you.           Email: Tammy@TammYoga.com

Facebook: TammYoga

Twitter: @TammYoga

Namaste  (The spirit in me respects the spirit in you.)

Tammy





Spring Has Sprung!

4 05 2012

This is my article printed in the Weekly Record Herald on April 29, 2012.

Hi, my name is Tammy Shellhaas. I am a yoga instructor/personal trainer and I would like you to join me on a journey to challenge your mind, body, and soul. Every other week we will explore a new aspect of a healthy lifestyle. My hope is to offer new information, or a new perspective to what you already know, or reintroduce an idea that may have been forgotten. So, let’s get started…

Spring has sprung! I mowed the grass for the first time this season. It is early, but I am thoroughly enjoying the weather. Flowers and trees are blooming. Spring is a time of new beginnings. Many of you may be thinking of beginning an exercise plan and considering walking or running. These are great options to increase cardiovascular fitness, lose weight, and reduce other health risks. But, where do you start?

Before you start any workout program, check with your doctor. Then remember to start slow. Exercise should be a part of your lifestyle, not something just to help you reach a certain weight or fit into a piece of clothing.

Find something you like to do. Remember, everyone is at a different stage of fitness, has different goals, and different likes. You will look forward to exercising when you enjoy it and you will be more apt to continue.

There are great beginner programs to coach you to reach a goal of 5k, 10k, 1/2 marathons, and full marathons. Google “0-5K”or “0-10K” and you will find programs which help you to gradually and safely reach your goals. There are even inexpensive smart phone apps to talk you through your runs while listening to one of your favorite playlists.

Need inspiration? Find music that makes you want to move, sing, or just makes you feel good. Download the songs to your smart phone or MP3 player and get moving. You can even Google playlist suggestions to walk or run to.

Don’t go it alone. Ask a co-worker or your spouse to join you. I bet your dog could use the walk, too.

Once you make the decision to start, you will feel better mentally and physically. It is a journey. Enjoy the journey. Notice your surroundings: listen to the birds, feel the breeze on your face, and smell the food cooking on the neighbor’s grill. And be grateful for this journey.

Tammy’s Challenges

Growth does not come from one perspective. To achieve a healthy lifestyle, you must do more than concentrate on exercise alone. Diet changes will enhance your wellbeing, but it alone is not healthy. Let’s not forget the soul or spirit. It needs nurturing as well. So, here are a few mind (diet) – body (exercise) – soul (mental) challenges for you to try.

Mind: Plan the next day’s meals the day before or plan for the entire week.

Body: Walk a little faster and lighter during your normal day. Pull in the abdominal muscles, hips over your feet, land softly, and pick up the pace. Notice how you feel a little more confident and self-assured.

Soul: Greet everyone with a smile.

I would love to hear from you.           Email: Tammy@TammYoga.com

Facebook: TammYoga

Twitter: @TammYoga

Namaste  (The spirit in me respects the spirit in you.)

Tammy





Spring

22 03 2012
Spring has sprung! I mowed the grass for the first time this season. It is early, but I am thoroughly enjoying the weather. Flowers and trees are blooming. Spring is a time of new beginnings. Many of you may be thinking of beginnin an exercise plan and considering walking or running. These are great options to increase cardiovascular fitness, lose weight, and reduce other health risks. But, where do you start?
Before you start any workout program, check with your doctor. Then remember to start slow. Exercise should be a part of your lifestyle, not something just to help you reach a certain weight or fit into a piece of clothing.
Find something you like to do. Remember, everyone is at a different stage of fitness, has different goals, and different likes. You will look forward to exercising when you enjoy it and you will be more apt to continue.
There are great beginner programs to coach you to reach a goal of 5k, 10k, 1/2 marathons, and full marathons. Google “0-5K”or “0-10K” and you will find programs which help you to gradually and safely reach your goals. There are even inexpensive smart phone apps to talk you through your runs while listening to one of your favorite playlists.
Need inspiration? Find music that makes you want to move, sing, or just makes you feel good. Download the songs to your smart phone or MP3 player and get moving. You can even Google playlist suggestions to walk or run to.
Don’t go it alone. Ask a co-worker or your spouse to join you. I bet your dog could use the walk, too.
Once you make the decision to start, you will feel better mentally and physically. It is a journey. Enjoy the journey. Notice your surroundings: listen to the birds, feel the breese on you face, and smell the food cooking on the neighbor’s grill. And be grateful for this journey.